Frustrated with Fleas?!

Downtown Charleston has a problem…FLEAS! The low country is prime real estate for fleas, but downtown has more than its fair share! Many clients have come in seeking relief for their itchy, uncomfortable pets since we opened our doors. Ridding your environment of fleas can be a frustrating endeavor – especially when it is difficult to control the environment outside your home. Strays, squirrels, and the dog next door may constantly infest the area with fleas. There are a few tricks of the trade that can help you get control through!

The need to know info:

1. Adult fleas like to stay on the animal, therefore you MUST TREAT THE PET. ALL the pets!
First, you must prevent those fleas from biting, laying eggs, and surviving on your pet. Fleas will constantly jump on your pet in the yard, during walks, and at the dog park. There are many oral and topical products available. Talk to your vet about the safest and best option for your lifestyle and for your pet. Some pets have an allergy to the flea saliva so even one flea bite can lead to intense itching. Consistent and appropriate flea prevention will help to reduce the discomfort! And if you only treat your dog but your roommate has a cat…your flea problem will continue. Everyone needs safe flea prevention. (Remember – not all over the counter flea prevention is safe for cats – read the label, and NEVER apply a dog product on a cat!)

2. Flea eggs are laid by those adult fleas on your pet and then quickly fall off. They land wherever the pet spends the most time (cushions, bedding, carpets), therefore you MUST TREAT THE ENVIRONMENT. 90% of the flea population is around the home, not on the pet!

a.Remove all toys, clothing, and storage from floors, under beds, and in closets to allow the areas to be treated.
b. Remove pets, pet food, bowls, fish or snake tanks from the area to be treated.
c. Wash and dry all pet bedding, throw rugs, and blankets.
d. Vacuum the environment daily for several days after the home is treated. The goal is to remove as many flea eggs and larvae as possible to prevent  them from hatching into adults down the road. Remember to vacuum under cushions, in corners of the room, and under all furniture. Flea eggs and    larvae like dark, warm areas! Be sure to empty the bag/canister after each vacuuming session.
e. Apply a safe insecticide to the indoor and outdoor environments. Discuss options with your veterinarian or your exterminator. People and pets       should remain away from treated areas until the product is dry. Remember to address those areas where your pet hides or sleeps such as under the bed! Areas of the yard where the pet plays and sleeps as well as areas under porches will need to be treated too.

3. Those eggs that do survive will hatch into larvae which transform into pupae in protective cocoons. The cocoons protect the pupae from insecticides for up to 4 weeks or longer – therefore treatment MUST BE CONSISTENT and on-going. Even after treating the pet and the environment you may see a few fleas as they emerge from the cocoon and hop a ride on your pet! Don’t worry, they won’t last long! Make sure to repeat the environment cleaning in 2 to 4 weeks to capture each and every cycle of the fleas.

-Dr. Kahuda

 

What does your dog like to do?

By: Janette Blackwood, DVMJanette Blackwood, DVM with pup

My first couple of years out of veterinary school, I worked out in a military town in Georgia. One day, I had a client come in with a new adult shetland sheepdog rescued from the shelter. Even though it was about a decade ago, I still remember reading the paperwork filled out by the original owner at the time the dog was surrendered to the shelter. The paperwork had a list of the standard questions you would see on these forms, such as “Is this dog on heartworm and flea prevention?” or “Is he good with small children?” But, there was one question and answer that really stuck out to me, because it really made me think about the bonds (or lack of bonds) that we form with our pets:

Question: “What does he/she enjoy doing?”
Answer provided by owner surrendering pet: “I don’t know.”

The relationship (or lack thereof) between an animal and a pet can be so valuable, that it actually has a medical term taught in veterinary colleges and recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA): “the human­-animal bond”. The AVMA’s website defines the human-­animal bond as “a mutually beneficial and dynamic relationship between people and animals that is influenced by behaviors that are essential to the health and well ­being of both.” The definition further goes on to state that a veterinarian should work to maximize the potential of this bond between their clients and pets. As a new graduate, my mind was constantly in a whirl to make sure that I was keeping my animal patients’ bodies physically healthy. Were all my dog and cat patients on parasite prevention monthly and properly vaccinated to keep them safe from infectious diseases? Were my senior pets comfortable in managing their arthritis? And, were my senior sets treated appropriately for their periodontal disease, so that they would continue to eat without pain? But, reading that question from that shelter’s paperwork really got me thinking about wondering if I was doing enough to make sure that my pets were also happy in their daily lives, thereby building that human­-animal bond.

At the time that I was meeting that newly adopted Sheltie, my own little white, fluffy mutt Radar was a young guy full of tremendous energy. And, even though we had only had him for a few months, I knew for sure how to answer the question: “What does he enjoy doing?” He has always loved the game of chase with anyone throwing a squeaky toy. He loves long walks in any new area; bonus points if there are random tuffs of grass for him to mark as his own. The end to a perfect day full of activity would consist of a quiet evening with a Greenie chew and maybe a little tomato for dessert after eating his dry kibble. And, if you were sitting on the floor, he can always find a way to position himself directly in front of you in the perfect location for a gaining a back rub.

As Radar and I both grow older and life finds me and my family somehow busier than ever, I do have to make myself stop and reassess: Am I still providing Radar what he needs to be happy? He is so quiet; he rarely complains. At these times, I usually stop what I am doing and grab his harness and leash. Then, we head outside for a walk through the neighborhood, making sure to walk a little more slowly in the areas with tall tufts of grass.

If you feel inclined, comment below on what you feels gives your pets meaning and happiness in life. It might give others ideas of activities to do with their pets, especially as the nice weather is starting to return.

Janette Blackwood, DVM

Website to the AVMA description of The Human­-Animal Bond.
https://www.avma.org/kb/resources/reference/human­animal­bond/pages/human­animal­bond­avma.aspx

Puppy Social Hour for Pups 10 weeks to 5 months old

Purely Positive Dog TrainingCharleston Harbor Veterinarians logo blueblack horizontal

Does your puppy have more energy than you ever thought possible? Is the early sunset making it tough to fit in playtime or walks?

We are excited to invite you to a puppy social hour at Charleston Harbor Veterinarians.  This is an opportunity for your pup to have some playtime while you relax with a snack and a glass of wine or beer.

Purely Positive’s C.C. Casale will be here to answer your questions about behavior and training as well as to encourage appropriate puppy play.

Puppy Social Hour
@Charleston Harbor Veterinarians

Wednesday November 18th
6pm
280 Rutledge Avenue

RSVP – CHVTeam@charlestonvets.com
Free for our CHV pups and owners – $10 at door for visitors

Please make sure your pup is over 10 weeks old (under 5 months) and up to date on deworming and the DHPP booster vaccine.
Please keep your puppy at home if you have recently noticed diarrhea, vomiting, sneezing, or coughing.

Collage of puppies at Charleston Harbor Veterinarians

Blood Sample with Heartworms

Have you ever wondered what heartworms look like? If you look closely, you might catch a few wiggling heartworm microfilariae in this video of a blood sample!

On the 1st of each month,  don’t forget to give your monthly heartworm and flea/tick prevention to protect your furkids from these nasty guys!

Xylitol: Toxic to Dogs and Now Found in Some Peanut Butters

By: Janette Blackwood, DVM

My husband and I have an inside joke where he knows that I become enraged when we purchase a product from the supermarket, only to get it home and find out that it contains an artificial or alternative sweetener. I take a bite out of the item, say “Why is this gross?”, and throw a fit like a toddler when I read the label. I think the last thing he accidentally purchased was Welch’s Light Grape Juice, that only reading the fine print on the label revealed that it contained aspartame. My point is always that I think that that labeling on our food should be more obvious. This could not be even more important when it comes to the recent addition of xylitol to a few brands of peanut butter during the last few months.Xylitol in peanut butter is toxic to dogs

Xylitol is actually not an artificial sweetener, but a naturally derived sugar alcohol. In 2006, I first read about the use of xylitol in sugar free gum in an article of Veterinary Medicine.

The problem occurs when dogs accidentally (or purposely) ingest the product. Due to differences in canine and human metabolism, dogs ingesting products containing xylitol experience profound life-threatening hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and can develop hepatic necrosis (liver failure). Sometimes, pet owners have no idea when they bring their pet to the veterinarian on emergency for seizures that their home even contained products with xylitol as an ingredient. In fact, it wasn’t until today when I made the effort to look up xylitol containing products that I even realized that I had been carrying around a tin of breath mints in my purse that would be toxic for my dog Radar to find and eat.

This website may be useful for you to learn what products in your home contain xylitol.

The recent addition of xylitol to certain peanut butter brands (Nuts ‘n More, Krush Nutrition, and P-28 Foods) becomes even more tricky for a few reasons. For one thing, limited labeling on the products may make it hard for consumers to realize that they are even purchasing a product containing this ingredient. You have to really make an effort to read the fine print on the nutrition label. Limited labeling on some products has also made it difficult to know the exact amount of xylitol contained in a spoonful of the product for example, making it difficult for veterinarians to know how much of the toxic ingredient a dog has ingested. Lastly, for years, peanut butter has been recommended by veterinarians as an easy vehicle to be used by pet owners to administer pills. I know that Radar loves a little bit of peanut butter (or the sugar-loaded Trader Joe’s Cookie Butter) when my husband gives him his morning dose of gabapentin for his chronic back issues.

Here is a link to an article in DVM360 with more information.
Janette Blackwood, DVM